Tag: Horror

Halloween Horror Ambient Mix – 2018

A mix of the creepiest dark ambient tracks I could compile! A blend of brand new tracks with some classics intertwined. Perfect for a solitary night of reading horror fiction or scaring the trick or treaters. Over two hours of seamlessly mixed darkness! Enjoy!

See links to all included albums below the Mixcloud player!

01. 0:00:00 Mortaur – Moving in Darkness
02. 0:03:35 Manifesto – Hive
03. 0:12:55 Northumbria – The Wìndjigò
04. 0:17:45 Archon Satani – Exceeding Insalubrity
05. 0:22:15 Alphaxone & Xerxes the Dark – Ancient Amulet
06. 0:26:20 Skincage – Lost Carcosa
07. 0:28:20 RNGMNN – Spectral Lines (Exclusive preview from upcoming album!)
08. 0:33:50 Svartsinn – Doubt as Sin (Nietzsce’s Lament)
09. 0:39:05 raison d’etre – Katharsis (Follow the link to the new vinyl re-release!)
10. 0:45:10 Cities Last Broadcast – Anomaly
11. 0:47:05 Nordvargr – I See Shadows
12. 0:51:20 Dronny Darko – Pale Shadows
13. 0:53:50 Apocryphos – Tenebrous
14. 1:01:30 Bonedust – When The Heavens Flee
15. 1:04:10 Atrium Carceri – The Maze
16. 1:07:05 Mater Suspiria Vision – Satan Oh Satan
17. 1:07:55 Randal Collier-Ford – Hellgate
18. 1:13:05 Oestergaards – Nihilist
19. 1:17:50 L’Horrible Passion – Apatheia
20. 1:26:15 Uncertain – Seedling (Withering)
21. 1:31:10 The Kilimanjaro Darkjazz Ensemble – Giallo
22. 1:37:00 Dahlia’s Tear – The Frozen Echoes of the Endless Moor
23. 1:42:45 Emilia – Closed Eyes
24. 1:44:10 Taphephobia & Bleak Fiction – Sick Route
25. 1:47:40 VelgeNaturlig – Grey Sun
26. 1:48:50 Ajna – Black Room
27. 1:55:30 Caleb R.K. Williams – Spectral Throne
28. 1:56:55 Moloch Conspiracy – The Awful Ritual
29. 2:03:05 Dead Melodies – Haunted by Whispers
30. 2:08:00 Flowers for Bodysnatchers – A Darker Rebirth
31. 2:14:50 Sana Obruent – The Haunted Waltz

Ruptured World – Interview

From the first seconds of Exoplanetary, the new Cryo Chamber release by Ruptured World, I knew this was going to be a unique and incredibly entertaining album. I was not wrong. As I found out more about the man behind the project, its breadth and attention to detail became more understandable. I will preface the interview with this “about me” from Rennie’s Amazon page:

Alistair Rennie is author of the weird, sword and debauchery novel, BleakWarrior. He has published weird fantasy and horror fiction, essays and poetry in The New Weird anthology, Weird Tales magazine, Fabulous Whitby, Electric Velocipede, Mythic Delirium, Pevnost, Schlock Magazine, Horror Without Victims, Weird Fiction Review and Shadowed Realms.

He was born and grew up in the North of Scotland, has lived for ten years in Italy, and now lives in Edinburgh in the South of Scotland. He holds a first class Honours Degree in Literature from the University of Aberdeen and a PhD in Literature from the University of Edinburgh. He is a time-served Painter and Decorator and a veteran climber of numerous hills and mountains in the Western Highlands, the Cairngorms and the Italian Dolomites.

Interviewee: Alistair Rennie of Ruptured World
Conducted by: Michael Barnett

Michael Barnett: So, I want to get this stupid question out of the way first! While considering Exoplanetary for review, I felt some connections to The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951), googling it to make sure I had the correct title, I notice the main star is Michael Rennie. Any relation?

Alistair Rennie: That’s a great question! Unfortunately, the answer is no, we’re not related. Though my dad used to claim that we were. There’s a good chance I could be related to the alien Klaatu, however. The true star of the film.

Michael: On that same topic, what were some of the foundational influences on this project? Did you get inspiration from some of those old sci-fi films, like the one aforementioned?

Alistair: Yes, I did, as well as from elsewhere. I think it started off more influenced by 80s classics like Alien and John Carpenter’s The Thing, at least at the stage of writing, and with a strong Lovecraftian influence, too. But, when it came to recording, the older archaic broadcasting style came out in a very spontaneous and natural way, and I liked the way it blended unusually with the more modern electronic soundscapes and drones of the music.
Films like Them, War of the Worlds (also the musical version) and Forbidden Planet, and also the kind of narration you sometimes get in the old Hammer Horror films – they’re definitely in there.

Michael: Before we get into your new album on Cryo Chamber, I thought you could tell us a bit about the writing side of your artistic journey. I am looking forward to reading BleakWarrior, which seems like it will be quite the tale, if the review snippets in your promo are any indication. I will assume the majority of readers here will be aware of your music before your writing. Would you like to tell us a short description of BleakWarrior in your own words?

Alistair: It’s a tricky one to describe because it was very experimental and incorporates a range of influences, including Sword and Sorcery, Manga/Anime, Cyberpunk, Elizabethan Revenge Tragedies, Ancient Greek and Celtic heroic verse, violent westerns, Classical Chinese Literature. It’s an attempt to blend the extremes of pulp and literary elements of fiction and turn them into something that combines sensationalist sex and violence with metaphysics. I tend to describe it as sword and debauchery, though that downplays some of the more philosophical content that might be in there. In some ways, it’s also a study of what happens when we act or exist outside of a moral framework. If I were to summarise it in strictly generic terms, though, I’d call it dark weird fantasy, with significant SF and horror characteristics thrown into the mix.

Michael: Is the world in this book something that you would think dark ambient fans will find interesting?

Alistair: Without wishing to be presumptuous, I think so, yes. There are some very dark elements to the story and its characters. It’s very bleak, as the title suggests. But there’s also some over-the-top mayhem and humour that’s more black metal than dark ambient. There are also parts of the novel that focus on the natural world and ideas relating to the metaphysics of physical nature, which I think is clearly a theme of dark ambient music on a number of levels. You can see that with many of the artists on the Cryo Chamber label.

Michael: Would you like to tell readers a few recommendations in case they are interested in reading your other works?

Alistair: I think dark ambient fans might be interest in what’s been called New Weird fiction and, in particular, in an anthology called the New Weird which features a chapter from what later became BleakWarrior. It’s a ground-breaking anthology in many ways and features writers like Michael Moorcock and Clive Barker, Brian Evenson, Michael Cisco, Jeffrey Ford, Jeffrey Thomas, KJ Bishop – authors who, I think, would be interesting to fans of dark ambient.
In my own case, I have a story that’s coming out later this year in an anthology called Mechanical Animals to be released by Hex Publishers. The story I’ve contributed, called “The Island Brushed By Ghosts”, is set in the northwest of Scotland and deals with subjects pertaining to the nature of existence, as well as nature itself. It’s more cerebral and less frenzied than some of the other stuff I’ve written. If you prefer the mayhem, though, I had a recent story in an anthology called “DOA III” which was released by Blood Bound Books. It’s a sort of surreal slash horror SF far future story. Very dark! But also with elements of humour.

Michael: Which came first, your fiction writing or music production?

Alistair: That’s a very good question in the sense that they kind of evolved together. Music came first in terms of actually creating songs, finished works, as it were. With writing, I started off writing song lyrics and poetry. Fiction, writing stories, came much later, in my late teens, and writing stories that were actually completed and presentable came later still. But I believe that there’s a very close connection between music and writing, which is stating the obvious, really. Often, with writing, you’re striving to find harmony and rhythm, not only in the prose, but in the proportions of the story-telling, the narrative itself, to create a unified organic whole out of something (language) that is essentially chaotic and uncontrolled. Music does that, but with sounds instead of written symbols and utterances. And, of course, language itself is inherently musical.

Michael: How have these two elements been able to come together for you in the Ruptured World project? Did it originate as a story idea, or was it always meant to be this spoken-word blended with dark ambient format from its inception?

Alistair: I think what came first was the idea of using radio transmissions – which I find to be deeply mysterious, an area of activity where the technology and mystical elements of nature come together within the context of sound. I’ve always been fascinated by radio, especially by short wave radio. I remember when I was younger, before there was an internet or even home computers, I used to tune into voices and music from other parts of the world and found it incredibly exciting and amazing to be able to tap into the atmosphere of other countries. It still fascinates me today, even while it has been dramatically superseded by the internet.

Michael: Have you worked in other styles of music, or is Ruptured World your first foray into the musical world?

Alistair: I’ve been involved in music since I was twelve years old. I started off playing in a punk band and later played in an indie band that was fairly well known locally in the north of Scotland. And I also grew up playing folk music, which is not uncommon for musicians from Scotland, where there’s a very strong and innovative folk music scene. But, alongside all this, and right from the start, me and one of my friends had formed our own music project, which is very much the origins of what is now Ruptured World. We were influenced by bands like Bauhaus, the Virgin Prunes, the Cure, the Birthday Party, Japan and David Sylvian. There was just the two of us. We couldn’t find a third band member who shared the same tastes or ideas as us, so we couldn’t do a standard three or four piece thing. So we improvised. I had a Casio keyboard and we had guitars. We used all sorts of other things to generate noise, everything from biscuit tins to crash helmets, often using our voices as sound effects. And we also did spoken word. I still have old recordings on cassettes. More recently, we revived some of our old songs, did new versions of them using the technology of today. It was wonderful. The music is dark, sometimes haunting and melodic, but also low-fi and deliberately crude and primitive in terms of sound and style.

Michael: You performed all the vocal parts on Exoplanetary, and I assume Frontiers of Disorder as well? I, personally, love your vocal performance on these albums. Have you heard things like this in the past that inspired you? Or is this an idea you came up with to combine your loves of music and storytelling?

Alistair: There are definitely precedents for combining narration and music that have no doubt influenced me. There is nothing I can point to directly as an influence in this particular case. But I think War of the Worlds is certainly there, and audio recordings of poetry I’ve listened to over the years. And some of David Sylvian’s music where music and spoken words are combined. I also recall an old album a friend of mine had, one of those Dungeons and Dragons albums they used to produce, where a D&D story is narrated alongside the music. When you hear music and storytelling done together, I think it’s a very natural combination and, indeed, one that occurs every time we watch visual narratives realised in film. We forget that film is also an audio as well as a visual medium. I suppose, in many ways, that’s what Exoplanetary aims to be – a narrative and soundtrack conceived as a film but rendered and delivered through the medium of sound only.

Michael: Will you be continuing to work in this format on future releases?

Alistair: Yes, I think that’s a certainty. It’s a fascinating and extremely enjoyable challenge to integrate the musical and spoken word elements together. And trying to find ways of delivering the spoken narration, and do so effectively, is an extremely enjoyable if often difficult thing to aim for. And, being a writer, for me it’s just the obvious and natural thing to do, I think.

Michael: On the technical side, do you prefer working with digital soundscapes or do you incorporate modular synths or other such equipment into the mix?

Alistair: I tend to work principally with digital soundscapes combined with live materials gained from different sources and approaches, often through sampling where I take live recordings of instruments or objects and sounds derived from various places, and using them all as part of the digital tableaux. I have a very experimental approach, often unconventional, which is also true of my writing, and I try to explore those areas which are off-piste, as it were.
One approach I’m seeking to develop now derives from an interest I have in ideas relating to the “genius loci” or spirit of place. This is a literary term that, among other things, refers to the specific conditions or essence of a particular place or geographic location. I’m looking to do live recordings in specific locations using instruments and devices channeled and amplified through conventional hardware, then integrated into the soundscape of the purely digital environment. So, it’s trying to take the essence and evocation of a particular place and preserve it in the alternative digital universe, as it were. Not an easy thing, but something to aim for!

Michael: If you used many field recordings on Exoplanetary, what was the process like capturing these sounds? Were you able to work with some sound banks or did you take field recording expeditions?

Alistair: I use only field recordings, precisely for the reasons given above. It’s the fascination of the specificity of the sound and the particular place or conditions in which it was conceived and recorded. The active participation in the process from start to finish has a strong fascination for me. Not that I don’t think sound banks are useful. They are a valuable and viable resource. And, for me, the rule is to use anything and everything that works for the creation of the sound or music, so a certain magpie instinct is necessary for gathering sounds and adapting them to the creative process. But, in my own case, the fascination requires me to follow the goal of capturing a unique essence and trying to integrate it into the overall composition. I suppose that might sound somewhat airy fairy! But I think anything that injects your music with an additional sense of purpose is worth pursuing. It will ultimately lead to better results in being driven by the conviction of an established methodology.

Michael: You’ve mentioned previously that you are an avid climber, it seems you’ve reached the summit of a good number of mountains around the world. Do you have a particular love of nature or is this more a physical drive for you? Do you think these excursions in nature lead to a deeper understanding of this dark ambient genre?

Alistair: The love of nature I think is the overriding passion, but I also relish the physical contact with the natural world and the physical effort it requires of you. Walking in mountains, in heightened terrain that changes your visual perspective of the world, is exhilarating for all sorts of reasons. You see the world, quite literally, in a different way, in the way it actually is. You see how the contours lie, how the habitable spaces are often actually small pockets or strips of land surrounded by hostile terrain. The close contact with weather conditions is always a great source of inspiration for me, and also the fear you feel when you’re faced with raw nature.
And I think these are facets of our experience which are very much at the heart of the dark ambient coterie of themes. Importantly, dark ambient doesn’t deal solely with the beauty and spiritual amplitude of nature, which are ably and admirably covered by many artists in the ambient and new age genres, for example. Dark ambient has a preoccupation with the more menacing aspects of nature, with its innate power and mysterious forces which, while crudely scientific, are nevertheless suggestive of something greater. And I think this is where we receive a sense of awe that causes us to look on nature with a primitive response we cannot summarise in words. Hence, we resort to music and sounds as a means of expressing it, which is very much the territory of dark ambient.

Dark ambient has a preoccupation with the more menacing aspects of nature, with its innate power and mysterious forces which, while crudely scientific, are nevertheless suggestive of something greater.

You find in old mythologies that humans, when confronted by gods, must shield their eyes because, if they don’t, they will be driven mad by the beauty and terror of the deity they look upon. I think dark ambient is a form of music that dares to look upon the gods and seeks to reiterate what it sees through the language of sounds.

Michael: What would be your dream project? If you could secure funding for any sort of project?

Alistair: It would have to be something that combined music with landscape. The Austrian musician, Manu Delago, recently led an expedition of 7 musicians into the Alps where they recorded music to be made into an album and film, called Parasol Peak. They recorded songs acoustically as they ascended through the various stages of their journey, and the results are incredible. So, doing something similar, but using electronic means of music production, would definitely be a dream project for me. And, to be honest, I don’t think it would require a huge amount of funds, so I may well go for it sometime soon! The problem would obviously be the need to generate power for electronic devices, but I’m sure there’d be a way.
Musician Paul Winter did a similar thing when he recorded music for an album in the Grand Canyon back in the 1980s. He and his musicians rafted down the river to find a spot to record music that would capture the echo generated by the canyon walls. Again, I would like to undertake a similar expedition with the objective of creating an electronic dark ambient extravaganza!

Michael: I’ll end on a bright note, how do you imagine Earth to look 100 years from now?

Alistair: Rain, rain, nothing but rain. Lots of gloom. No sunlight. Humans will evolve into vampires. A bit like Scotland during the summer, really.

Michael: Thank you very much for your time Alistair, I’ll leave the last words to you!

Alistair: Thank you, Michael! It’s been great to be in This Is Darkness. I very much wish you and your readership a prodigious abundance of lasting wellness!

Alistair Rennie’s Links

Ruptured World
: Official Website, Facebook,
Bandcamp (Exoplanetary)Bandcamp (Frontiers of Disorder)

Alistair Rennie’s Publications
: Official Website

Hezaliel – Paradise Lost – Review

Artist: Hezaliel
Album: Paradise Lost
Release date: 5 April 2018
Label: Eighth Tower Records

Tracklist:
01. The Pit of Hell
02. Altar of Demons
03. They Darkned the Land of Nile
04. Fallen Angels in a Distant Earth
05. The Snake’s Deception
06. Before and After the Human
07. Reflected in a Mirror of Sins
08. Paradise Lost

This will be my second review of an Eighth Tower Records studio album, the first being the latest Sonologyst offering Apocalypse (read the review here). Eighth Tower Records is a sub-label of the Unexplained Sounds Group, both run by Raffaele Pazzella (read our interview here). Eighth Tower focuses more on dark ambient leaning releases, and less on the experimental nature of USG. Their slogan being, “Superspectrum sounds from Ultraterrestrial dimensions.” Paradise Lost is the sixth proper full length release, but there are also a number of compilations (one reviewed here), which contain a combination of exclusive and previously released tracks, each focusing on a specific theme.

“I made him just and right, sufficient to have stood, though free to fall.”
― John Milton, Paradise Lost

Hezaliel is a project out of Belgium by Steve Fabry, who is also known for his work in metal projects The Nightstalker and Sercati. His Hezaliel music, in general, could be described as a sort of tasteful horror ambient. Meaning there is darkness abound in this release, but it never pushes that feeling too far, never taking us into the more absurd territory of some other horror ambient albums.

Our first encounter with the theme comes in the cover art, which is a beautiful 1866 engraving done by Paul Gustave Doré for John Milton‘s epic poem Paradise Lost, which was first published in 1667. The poem, and so too the album, focus on the biblical story of the fall of man, namely Satan’s deceit of Adam and Eve, resulting in the end of paradise. So, while I’ve stated that this is a sort of horror ambient album, the themes are of a religious nature. But, with a theme such as the fall of paradise the religious and horrifying can come together quite easily.

The first half of the album focuses on Satan and the other rebel fallen angels, in their underworld. Thus the music is given liberty to be incredibly dark, as the soundscapes are basically recreating hell itself. Though, within this darkness there are moments of almost a dark bliss, such as on “Fallen Angels in a Distant Earth”, which includes what sounds to be field recordings of crashing waves, as if we are following the fallen angels on a walk along a prehistoric coastline.

Paul Gustave Doré – Engraving from Paradise Lost

The second half takes on more an air of sadness and regret. There are more likely to be fleeting melodies emerging from the background. The dense soundscapes give way to more peaceful qualities, as the storyline is generally pulling us toward a sad conclusion, which will play out over following millennia.

Hezaliel has crafted an album, in Paradise Lost, which is first and foremost an enjoyable listen. It has that perfect balance of active and passive qualities, giving it a higher level of replayability over an extended period of time. His techniques seem to have improved since his debut, In The World of the Anesthetist which came out on Kalpamantra in early 2017. Following the narrative of a tried and true classic, like Paradise Lost by John Milton, gives Hezaliel room to build a story with more details that are able to be understood immediately by the average listener.

Paradise Lost is one of my favorite yet on Eighth Tower Records. Hezaliel has shown that he is up to the task of creating dark ambient albums with depth and detail. The theme for this one seemed quite appropriate for a dark ambient album, and it also fit very nicely with the general aesthetic of Eighth Tower Records, keeping that focus on the “ultra-terrestrial” intact. I would recommend Paradise Lost to those that prefer there dark ambient to be a bit more active, but never abrupt or jarring. It makes for a nice reading companion, but it is also able to keep your attention during isolated listening sessions in a dark room with headphones.  With a heavy focus on theme and an ability to show reservation when creating such dark soundscapes, Hezaliel will certainly be an artist to watch over the coming years.

Written by: Michael Barnett

All Internal by Terence Hannum – Book Review

Author: Terence Hannum
Book: All Internal
Release date: 30 April 2018
Publishing House: Dynatox Ministries

I briefly met Terence Hannum at the APEX Fest 2015 here in Baltimore, Maryland. He’s involved in a number of different things around the music and art scene here, and so it was only a matter of time before we crossed paths. Most interesting to me was his musical work as the singer/synth/electronics guy in the band Locrian. He recently released his debut as part of the Lynchian sort of darkish synth-pop group The Holy Circle on Annihilvs Power Electronix. He’s also recently begun to release albums and perform solo as the power-electronics project Axebreaker. While all these projects are quite interesting to me, they all dance around the edges of dark ambient, and I’ve yet to properly cover one, though I have listened to and enjoyed all three of these named projects repeatedly.

Hannum’s first novella, Beneath the Remains, released in 2016 and focused on a young boy in Florida, as he dealt with the aftermath of his older brother’s disappearance. It often raised feelings of nostalgia, yet there was a darkness that always lurked beneath the surface, creeping up through various events as the story progressed.

Two years later, Hannum returns with his second novella, All Internal. A story which takes a deep look, literally and through allegory at some of the darker elements of the age of social media, and the underbelly of video-clip internet porn and webcam modeling. But, Hannum doesn’t simply give us a standard tale of someone’s misfortunes. All Internal instead takes the horror/ sci-fi/ weird-fiction route, with a large helping of graphic (sexual and otherwise) detail along the way. In this way, Hannum is able to blend together his passions for fine writing and cultural politics, highlighting his more academic side, with his loves for darker topics, previously explored through his musical projects and artwork.

All Internal takes some pretty interesting twists and turns along the way. Not knowing what to expect next, or understanding the context in which something is happening adds a lot to the overall effect here. So, I won’t be going into the actual storyline in any detail in this review. Instead, I’d prefer to focus on the reasons why, and type of person that may enjoy this sort of story.

Hannum’s writing style on All Internal makes use of quick snippets of information. Scenes/chapters which may only last for 1 – 3 pages on average. I find this to be an incredibly potent writing style in our current culture, where the average person consumes the majority of their news through headlines and talking points, not in depth articles and discussions. A time when presidents make their case for policy in 280 characters or less. But, any possible disdain for this situation aside, these short paragraphs really do make for a meaningful reading experience. When you are able to consume a section of text, and then stop to think about its possible deeper meanings.

As for deeper meanings, there is a lot to unpack here. One could innocently read through this 100 +/- pages of text without taking any allegorical meanings or greater contexts into consideration. Which would be fine. But it is quite interesting to dig into the topics and scenarios presented, and wonder exactly how much more Hannum could be conveying. As I read through the story, I took note of various ideas arising, things that seemed to parallel Hannum’s narrative.

One huge and recurring theme, for me, was the question of the soul. Hannum clearly points out the question of mind or body. But, this question is taken to its furthest extents. Do we have free will or are we slaves to our ritualized patterns. Is the mind really telling the body what to do, or is the mind just noticing that the body is doing, without any ability to influence. Another important topic that seemed, to me, unavoidable when reading All Internal, is the question of women’s reproductive rights. Or in an even broader sense, humanity’s ability to fully comprehend and then influence decisions on reproduction in relation to the planet’s overall population and ability to sustain itself.

Hannum’s writing style is certainly modern. The topics I believe he is alluding to are front and center in modern times. But, as I read All Internal, I also felt that Hannum found a lot of influence and inspiration from the weird-fiction authors of the 1920s and 1930s. Maybe this is just because of my constant saturation in this topic, but I seemed to notice some striking allusions, or at least nods, to the writings of H.P. Lovecraft and maybe even more of Clark Ashton Smith. Without going into any detail that would speak directly to plot twists, there were several moments, especially in the second half of the story, as Hannum begins to unveil more specifics of the story’s framework. Whether I’m right or wrong to make a connection there, I would certainly say that fans of those authors, and more modern authors like Neil Gaiman and Thomas Ligotti will certainly find things to love. In many respects, Hannum takes these sorts of themes and steps the intensity up, to something more on par with our current societal norms/boundaries.

All Internal is a quick and enjoyable read. One that you could knock out rather quickly, if the story so engrosses you. Or, one which you can casually read in these short 1-3 page sections, over a greater period of time. While I already loved Beneath the Remains, I found All Internal more stylistically in line with some of my favorites, and so I would want to recommend this as well to our readers, many being generally fans of the same sorts of stories and films. I found my playlist of dark ambient awaiting review was the perfect accompaniment to this story, at certain times playing things on one end of the spectrum, but as the story took twists, I was adjusting the music’s themes accordingly. An all around enjoyable experience. I’m definitely hoping Hannum does more future work in this vein!

Review by: Michael Barnett

Horror Ambient – 3 Hour Seamless Dark Ambient Mix

A horrific 3 hour seamless mix of the most chilling and tenebrous dark ambient music released over the last year or two. Dive into this one with all the bravery you can muster. The outer gods meet the most human of fears for an intense experience of 100% dark ambient desolation.
Scroll below the player to find the track-list with links to each album!

01. 0:00:00 Flowers For Bodysnatchers – Red Ballerina (Oksana’s Theme)
02. 0:02:10 Svartsinn – Where No Other Can Follow (Demon Stalker)
03. 0:09:50 Sonologyst – Abandoned City
04. 0:15:45 New Oracle – Abyss
05. 0:20:00 Neraterrae – Deeper Down
06. 0:21:10 Skincage – Lost Carcosa
07. 0:23:05 Northaunt – Villmark
08. 0:29:50 Ajna – An Era of Torment I
09. 0:38:30 Dead Melodies – A Malvolent Rising
10. 0:43:00 A Cryo Chamber Collaboration – Yog-Sothoth I (edit)
11. 0:45:30 Ben Rath – The Devil In Disguise
12. 0:52:30 Apocryphos – Tenebrous
13. 1:01:00 Flowers for Bodysnatchers – Black Catechism
14. 1:11:40 Sun Through Eyelids – Sinew of the Earth
15. 1:15:45 Day Before Us – In Igne Purgatorio
16. 1:18:35 Anemone Tube – Perpetual Dawn
17. 1:22:15 Randal Collier-Ford – And Hell Followed
18. 1:23:52 Atrium Carceri – Slower
19. 1:28:50 Monocube – Initiation feat. Asmorod
20. 1:34:10 Elegi – Vemod
21. 1:40:45 Fear-Modern-Man – Daiichi
22. 1:52:05 New Risen Throne – Cold, Dying Sun
23. 1:56:30 Shock Frontier – Tumult feat. Kristoffer Oustad
24. 2:04:45 Cities Last Broadcast – Glossolalia
25. 2:10:15 Dodsmaskin – Baldom
26. 2:19:50 Jinthra – Fylfos Rite
27. 2:26:55 Noctilucant – Beholding the Murk
28. 2:36:40 Black Wanderer – Station4
29. 2:39:10 A Cryo Chamber Collaboration – Azathoth II (edit)
30. 2:46:45 Melek-Tha & Corona Barathri – Dark Heresy [The Edge of Darkness]
31. 2:53:05 A Cryo Chamber Collaboration – Azathoth II (edit)

Frozen In Time: Weekly News 27 September

This week we did a little catching up at This Is Darkness and have some more reviews for followers to read. As we move further into the fall dark ambient releases are sure to pick up, I have a feeling there will be some great music coming our way between now and year’s end. If you haven’t yet done so, check out our new compilation! There are also a number of music videos and a short film to check out this week. I personally watched EXSANGUINATA in full a few days ago and really enjoyed it!

This Is Darkness Compilation

Music Videos / Teasers

ExSanguinata – New Short Film
EXSANGUINATA, the new film from director GRETCHEN HEINEL and band SABBATH ASSEMBLY, asks: Wherefore the quest for eternal life? To what lengths would any of us go to stave off the inexorable rite of aging, sickness, and finally… death.
The film reveals a noblewoman and her devotees perpetuating their power by preying upon her subjects. For each young victim, the rite of adolescence becomes a rite of death. And for the noblewoman – the COUNTESS BATHORY – the rite of death becomes a rite of adolescence. Roles reversed, through blood sacrifice.

Gamardah Fungus – Old Manor Spirits (Official Video by Kol Belov)
“Old Manor Spirits” is Gamardah Fungus track from “Fairytales” album [Out on October, 2 at Flaming Pines, 2017]

La Tredicesima Luna – Album Teaser
Excerpt from the upcoming cassette album from La Tredicesima Luna (new project from the man behind Medhelan) entitled “Il Sentiero Degli Dei”. Coming soon from Lighten Up Sounds.

Mebitek – Teaser #2
As rain, teardrops, thou art slipping on the window pane and I cannot catch thee. Then, I look at thee through my imagination window: idealised, perfect, mine, in a loop, until the end of time.

New Releases & Pre-orders

Alone iN the Hollow Garden – New Album Released (CD/Digital)
“The journey of the Goddess Ishtar into the Underworld is channeled into a communion of four long pieces of ritual psychedelia with blackened doom atmosphere. Once more, Alone In The Hollow Garden explores the boundless expression of sound as a sacred tool of creation and simultaneously as a transcendental vehicle for the exploration of the polarities which define our universe, light and shadow, masculine and feminine, intellect & intuition, power & emotion, creation & dissolution.
The album was created with the assistance of many experimental piezo based devices, metal percussions, kantele, amplified strings, all self built by Dan Serbanescu under the Temple Instruments name, a mark soon to be launched.
“Ishtar” is available in physical format as a standard limited edition CDr hosted in a beautiful recycled cardboard digibook packaging and as a “Special Amulet Edition”, containing a magick brass amulet beautifully handcrafted by ATMA. The Ring and Rod mesopotamian symbol uniting the Divine Feminine and the Divine Masculine is held in both hands by the Goddess Ishtar”

Crown of Asteria – New Album Released (Digital Only)
“Cyclical celebration of the slowly churning energy of transition into earthly stasis then death. A quick hitch in breath happens as we slow to notice the wonderment of change. Early Autumnal guises are given away by morning mists and the smell of wet rotting leaves and soil. Ghosts will soon bid welcome at the edge of the forests and all heed their call to shed old songs and sorrows. We follow the wild footprints back to our hiding places among root and stone. We take solace in the Ancestral communion in late night fogs and waxing moons. Impassioned words are given up to the wood-smoke, and in concealment we watch the veil thin.”

DR – Pre-order Available (Shimmering Moods – CD/Digital)
Relaxing drone-work for those lonely late evening hours of contemplation.

Gamardah Fungus – Pre-order Available (CD/Digital)
The album was inspired by the spellbinding events, which happened to us one night in an old abandoned manor, located in the forests of eastern Ukraine.
We found that strange place accidentally during a hike. The weather turned too bad, so we took refuge there with a hope that next day will be better. We had a recorder and Japanese end-blown flute shakuhachi with us and decided to make some records on the nature. In a while we heard how outward things began to talk to us. All strange growls, birds and whispers of undetermined origin were recorded that night. It was like a scary legend where spirits woke up and decided to tell their own stories with a help of wind, rain, flora and fauna.
Later we made some guitar and synthesizer sessions directly to old reel to reel recorder in order to create a suitable mysterious atmosphere to the album. Also we added creaks, scratches & noises of our unique Intonarumori machine made by Igor Yalivec, inspired by Luigi Russolo and Alexandre Landry devices.

Jurko Haltuu – Pre-order Available (Shimmering Moods – CD/Digital)
Ambient drone music with a hint of darkness.

Melul – New Album Released (Cephalopagus – Digital)
Angelus Inferus is a release of some of Melul’s familiar pieces, as well as collaborations with horror ambient extraordinaire Araphel. The angel of death, known formally as Azrael, is the main inspiration behind this album. As you listen, do be seduced by Azrael’s scythe of angelic lullabies, by the depths of his somber gaze. Just don’t let him smite you on the way out.

Mrako-Su – New Album Released (ΠΑΝΘΕΟΝ – CD/Digital)
“Autumn goddess made her first steps between the mountains. She touched some leaves, went through the glades of tall grass, poured rains over the tops… She heard whisperings of brooks and slow humming songs of oaks and accompanied them by howling of the wind. Only stones were silent, simply listening to the changes, absorbing the sunlight while it’s warm, watching the clouds becoming slower and darker. They’ve seen it so many times… Once there were people climbing here and there, living between rocks while summer lasts and hiding in the caves when winter came. There were camp-fires, songs and paintings on the walls… Then other people came, they measured everything and dug some holes, they were always looking for something. And they were gone as well, but nothing changed for the stones. They watched dawns and listened to whispers of the water. Their songs were way too slow for anyone to hear…”

Sa Bruxa – New Album Released (Required Rate of Return – CD/Digital)
New thirty minute ritual ambient experience from Sa Bruxa.

Sombre Soniks – New Compilation Released (Sombre Soniks – Digital)
Fourteenth in thee series of bi-annual kompilations presenting 23 Dark Ambient kompositions. This time thee participants were invited to kreate something that had a ‘Horror’ influence; a soundtrak to an imaginary Horror movie…
Also inkluded are thee 23 info kards with individual bakground art kreated by Madguten and kover artwork by Fabian van der Meer!

Tim Six – New Album Released (ΠΑΝΘΕΟΝ – CD/Digital)
“The idea for this recording was quite simple – to combine layers of sound obtained from different acoustic instruments (tracks 1 & 3) or field recordings (tracks 2 & 4) for creating aural space which can be perceived at different levels. First, the emotional level of simple background listening (which is becoming more and more common nowadays), which corresponds with idea of Аmbient music in terms of Eric Satie & Brian Eno. Then structural, or “analytic” level, on which our rational mind builds the picture of “what and how”, or at least tries to – because it’s not always easy with drone music. Third level is “deep listening” (according to Pauline Oliveros ideas) which involves unfocused listening experience, when one allows the sound to be as it is, without building a distance between the it and one’s perception.. Reaching this point one may realize that sound contains much more than just sum of used instruments & effects and its impact on perception reminds meditative state – full awareness without involvement to analysis and emotions.”

Winterblood – New Album Released (Digital Only)
A selected, remastered version of the limited self-released edition tapes released between 1996 and 1999. Recorded on elementary equipment, finally back to life from a lost archive. Raw and unclean, and very dangerous.

This Is Darkness Week in Review

Artist: Erang
Album: The First Age
Release date: 15 September 2017
Label: Self-released
Read review here.

Artist: Sysselmann
Album: The Northern Chronicles
Release date: 14 October 2016
Label: Tipi Token Records
Read review here.

Artist: Metatron Omega
Album: Illuminatio
Release date: 26 September 2017
Label: Cryo Chamber
Read review here.

Artist: Atrium Carceri & Cities Last Broadcast
Album: Black Corner Den
Release date: 5 September 2017
Label: Cryo Chamber
Read review here.

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